Common Ground

It’s Complicated: Race & Ethnicity in Latin American Art

Featuring Flávio Cerqueira, Karina Aguilera Skvirsky, and Adán Vallecillo in conversation with Dan Cameron

 

1 p.m. Eastern / 10 a.m. Pacific

Artists Flávio Cerqueira, Karina Aguilera Skvirsky, and Adán Vallecillo join Rail Editor-at-Large Dan Cameron for a conversation. We conclude with a poetry reading by Celina Su.

In this talk

Flávio Cerqueira

Flávio Cerqueira
As an artist and storyteller, Flávio Cerqueira creates vigorous figurative bronze sculptures, focused on the construction of narratives and representation of actions. The presence of everyday objects, such as mirrors, books, tree trunks, ramps, or stairs, creates tension with the out-of-scale bronze human figures. These scenarios take place inside the white cube, which functions as a pedestal, an attempt to blur the boundaries between sculpture and world and between the artwork and the viewer. Its intention is to problematize the relationship between space and spectator. Cerqueira uses sculpture as a tool to immobilize the moment of the fragment of a narrative.

Karina Aquilera Skvirsky

Karina Aquilera Skvirsky
Multidisciplinary artist Karina Aguilera Skvirsky’s practice began in photography and grew into video and performance. In 2019, she received a grant from Creative Capital to produce How to build a wall and other ruins, a project that includes a series of sculptural photographs, a multi-channel video installation and live performances. She has exhibited the project in solo exhibitions at Museo Amparo in Puebla, Mexico and Ponce + Robles Gallery in Madrid, Spain. Other important international exhibitions include her participation in Impermanence, the XIII Cuenca Biennial (Ecuador) curated by Dan Cameron in 2016 and There is always a cup of sea for man to sail, the 29th São Paulo Biennial in Brazil (2010).

Adán Vallecillo

Adán Vallecillo
Born 1977 in Honduras, Adán Vallecillo studied Fine Arts and Sociology in Honduras and Puerto Rico. He works and lives in Tegucigalpa, Honduras. The methodology of his art practice is strongly based on research on-site and combining local visual and social aspects. In 2020 he received the Prize for Mid-Career Artist from CIFO Grands and Commissions, and recently attended residencies FLORA ars+natura in Bogotá, Colombia in 2018 and LARA (Latin American Roaming Art), Panama City, Panama in 2017.

Dan Cameron

Dan Cameron
Courtesy of Dan Cameron
New York-based curator, art writer, and educator Dan Cameron began his career with the 1982 New Museum of Contemporary Art exhibition Extended Sensibilities: Homosexual Presence in Contemporary Art, the first museum effort in the U.S. to examine gay & lesbian identity in art. During his 11 years as Senior Curator at the New Museum, Cameron organized survey exhibitions of David Wojnarowicz, Martin Wong, Marcel Odenbach, among many others. He is Founding Director of Prospect New Orleans, which assists in the cultural rebuilding of the city after Hurricane Katrina. In 2016 he organized the exhibition When Jackie Met Ethyl on Jackie Curtis and Ethyl Eichelberger at Howl! Happening in New York. He is an Editor-at-Large at the Rail.

The Rail has a tradition of ending our conversations with a poem, and we’re fortunate to have Celina Su reading.

Celina Su

Celina Su
Celina Su was born in São Paulo, Brazil, and lives in Brooklyn, part of unceded Lenapehoking. Her first book of poetry, Landia, was published by Belladonna* in 2018. Her writing includes two poetry chapbooks, three books on the politics of social policy and civil society, and pieces in the _New York Times Magazine_, _n+1_, _Harper’s_, and elsewhere. Her creative, scholarly research, and pedagogical work focuses on everyday struggles for collective governance, centering economic democracy and racial justice. Su is the Marilyn J. Gittell Chair in Urban Studies and a Professor of Political Science at the City University of New York.