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Stendhall , translated from the French by Brian Evenson

MARIE-HENRI BEYLE (23 January 1783 - 23 March 1842), known by his nom de plume STENDHAL, was a master at acutely analyzing his characters' psychology. He is considered one of the earliest and foremost practitioners of realism. Le Rouge et le Noir (The Red and the Black, 1830) and La Chartreuse de Parme (The Chartreuse of Parma, 1839) are the two novels for which he is best known.



BRIAN EVENSON is the author of ten books of fiction, most recently the limited edition novella Baby Leg. He has translated work by Christian Gailly, Jean Fremon, Claro, Jacques Jouet, Eric Chevillard, Antoine Volodine, and others. He is the recipient of three O. Henry Prizes as well as an NEA fellowship.

FÉDER or the Gilded Husband

Check in every month for another installment of, Féder (or the Gilded Husband), this fantastic and unfinished novella that we will be serializing throughout the winter, spring and summer of ’11.

FÉDER or the Gilded Husband

At seventeen, Féder, one of the most well-to-do young men of Marseilles, was driven from his father’s home; he had just committed a grave error: he had married an actress of the Grand-Theatre.

FÉDER or the Gilded Husband

This expenditure, which would have seemed so stupid to Boissaux a month after his arrival in Paris, seemed decisive to Féder, who for more than a fortnight had watched and doubted.

FÉDER or the Gilded Husband

It should be said that ever since Féder—whose reputation as a painter of miniatures and as the inconsolable lover of his first wife was making giant strides—had seen a few thousand franc notes, the gift for commerce had awoken in him. In his early childhood, he had learned from his father the art of speculation and of keeping track of clinched deals.

FÉDER or the Gilded Husband

This experience filled our hero with a profound anxiety; Delangle’s suspicions weren’t appeased, and he was not the man to forget or neglect the consequences of an idea once it had entered his head.

FÉDER or the Gilded Husband
the final installment from an unfinished novella

That evening, he felt still more how crazy he was; in the foyer of the Opéra, he met Delangle, who said hello to him. He underwent a movement of terror, and the big voice of the Provincial, so little made to touch someone’s soul, rang out to the very depths of his.

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The Brooklyn Rail

NOV 2019

All Issues