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Marie Carter

Marie Carter is the editor of Word Jig: New Fiction from Scotland and author of forthcoming creative non-fiction book, The Trapeze Diaries (Hanging Loose Press, Spring 2008).

The Re-enactment of Lygia Clark’s Baba Antropofágica (Anthropophagic Droo)

“I dreamt that I opened my mouth and took out a substance incessantly. As this was happening I felt as if I was losing my own internal substance, which made me very anguished mainly because I could not stop losing it. In the work I made afterwards, which I called Cannibalistic Slobber, people had cotton reels in their mouths to expel and introject the slobber.” —Lygia Clark (Brazilian performance artist, 1920-1988)

Looking For a Place to Hang

On my first visit to New York, a New Yorker said to me, “this is a hard city to live in. The rents are high, work is often busy and stressful but what makes it worthwhile is that you’re always coming across cool, quirky places you’d probably never find anywhere else.”

A New Spin on an Old Tradition

Coming to the rescue at a laundromat near you is the Dirty Laundry: Loads of Prose reading series, which runs about once a month at various laundromats across the city.

Political Circus Dazzles Brooklyn

Every September since 1989, Circus Amok, a political, cross-dressing troupe, treats New Yorkers to free shows in parks throughout the city. They perform at upwards of sixteen parks in the five boroughs.

Lava Studio

On a Wednesday night at the Lava Studio in Prospect Heights, three students work on various techniques, including what’s known in the trapeze world as the bird’s nest, the plonge, and the gazelle, while others wait their turn, keeping warm doing handstands against the wall, crunches, splits, or handwalking on the mat.

On the Other Side

The airline refuses to take our money. "You don’t have to pay until you’ve arrived at your destination safely," says the woman at the desk, chewing on the ends of her pony tail between breaths.

Short and Lame

I scope the distance between roof ridge and ground. Long Knife leans out of the car window, looks at me and frowns. "Hector gets distressed when you do that," she says.

The Tarantella

Goldipunzel lived in a beautiful, large apartment with varnished wooden floors overlooking the Gowanus Canal. She had long flowing hair the color of daffodils. She owned only three things.

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The Brooklyn Rail

NOV 2019

All Issues