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Marcia E. Vetrocq

MARCIA E. VETROCQ is a writer, educator, and editor based in New York.

Guest Critic

RE: Re-

Our understanding of the art of the near and distant past is now bound up with the ways we deploy and respond to an array of replicas and re-enactment.

In Conversation

STEEL STILLMAN with Marcia E. Vetrocq

With solo exhibitions in Brooklyn and Amsterdam and the publication of an artist’s book, the photographer Steel Stillman is going public with a deceptively quiet and often disquieting body of work that has absorbed him for many years.

DAYS OF FUTURES PAST
Okwui Enwezor’s Eurocentric Venice Biennale

The Venice Biennale of 1990 was the first of many—every Biennale since, to be precise—that I’ve written about, and I was prompted to look back after returning from the 2015 edition.

In Conversation

SIMON STARLING with Marcia E. Vetrocq

Peripatetic and prolific, Simon Starling (b. 1967) has traveled to and across five continents since the early 1990s to research, fabricate, photograph, film, perform, and install his work.

Hew Locke: Patriots

There are two statues of Peter Stuyvesant—one in Jersey City and one in Manhattan’s Stuyvesant Square—among the seven monuments photographed by Hew Locke for his 2018 “Patriots” series.

Agnes Denes: Absolutes & Intermediates

From the start, Denes has wielded mathematics, philosophy, and unflinching logic as the instruments of an intellectually formidable practice that is driven by a passion—almost a hunger—for discovery.

ALLISON MILLER:
Feed Dogs

The six new paintings in Allison Miller’s compact exhibition at Susan Inglett make a convincing case for a capacious abstraction that is exacting yet playful, rich in smart art references yet firmly colloquial.

David Rabinowitch: Périgord Construction of Vision Drawings

In the course of fifty years of exhibiting his art, David Rabinowitch has come to be known for his rigorous empiricism, flinty intelligence, and serial investigations into the organizing operations of perception.

Irma Blank: Painting Between the Lines

A black-and-white photograph that accompanied Carrie Rickey’s feloniously uncomprehending review in Artforum at the time documents the work: hundreds of seemingly printed sheets of paper, aligned corner to corner and edge to edge, arrayed in three tiers that wrapped around three walls.

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The Brooklyn Rail

DEC 19-JAN 20

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