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L.J. Sunshine

L.J. SUNSHINE is a writer living in New York. She has written about dance and Italian cultural events for Oggi Sette.

PRESS UP CLOSE

Pierre Rigal’s Press, which had its U.S. premiere at the Baryshnikov Arts Center September 10-12, is built around a central gimmick: a man moves within a small box of a stage whose ceiling lowers progressively through the course of the hour-long solo. I attended opening night and, against my better judgment, accepted a seat in the front row where audience members were subjected, unwittingly, to a kind of extreme sensory assault before the show began: blinding hot stage lights beat into our faces from above.

A Man's World: CHARLIE’S ANGELS AT THE KITCHEN, October 22-24

“She dances like a man,” an audience member gushed about one of the tap stars in Jason Samuels Smith’s Charlie’s Angels. I’ve heard it said of women tappers before, but what, exactly, does it mean? (Not to mention, why is it a virtue?)

Culturemart Preview: LAURA PETERSON AND JOHARI MAYFIELD

Each time the HERE Arts Center door opened on January 12, another down-swaddled body squeezed inside the tiny lobby, and we got a blast of frosty air.

DANCING ON SCREEN, BIG AND SMALL

In like a lion, out like a lamb—but for dance-loving New Yorkers, this March also promises three anticipated film events. First, dance film pioneer Elaine Summers is honored over three evenings at Danspace Project at Saint Mark’s Church and one afternoon discussion at the New Museum, which will explore her influence on a younger generation of artists.

IN IT FOR THE DURATION: PERFORMANCE AT MOMA

On the Saturday afternoon in March of 70 mile an hour winds and trees crashing into houses, the line of those aspiring to participate in Marina Abramović’s 700+ hour MoMA performance piece, The Artist is Present, hadn’t budged for five hours.

A FINE ROMANCE

A broken white line rushes through the dark. We hurtle with it, as on a highway, until the line splits, becomes a barcode, a chromosomal map, a latticework of alphabetic sign. A woman emerges from the black; she’s joined by a man and they dance, ballroom style, their swirling figures tattooed by the light of the criss-crossing graphics.

NECESSARY WEATHER IN REVIVAL

Back in the early 1990’s, choreographer Dana Reitz and lighting designer Jennifer Tipton set up a laboratory at The Kitchen to investigate the “essential natures of movement and light.”

AESTHETICS OF DENIAL

Since you’re reading this article, chances are you’re an experienced, contemporary dance-goer and don’t need me to tell you that a piece of choreography can look like anything but. Nonetheless, there’s strange and there’s strange-er. Donna Uchizono’s longing two (June 1-5) belongs in the second category.

In Conversation

DERICK GRANT with L.J. Sunshine

The award-winning tap dancer Derick Grant, 38, is a veteran of Broadway and international stages. He’s also among today’s tap vanguard—improvising, choreographing, producing, and sharing his expertise with beginner and professional students alike.

Ballets Russes Centennial

One hundred years ago, Sergei Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes burned the stage of Paris’s Théâtre du Châtelet with its debut season. Dancers of unprecedented virtuosity performed ballets with exotic, Orientalist themes that expressed seething passions and defied the stiff formalism of the danse d’école.

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The Brooklyn Rail

MAR 2020

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