Search View Archive

David Winner

David Winner’s Kirkus-recommended novel, Tyler’s Last, concerns Patricia Highsmith and Ripley. His first novel, The Cannibal of Guadalajara, won the Gival Novel Prize and was nominated for the National Book Award  His writing has appeared in The Village VoiceThe Iowa ReviewThe Kenyon ReviewFiction, and several other venues in the U.S. and U.K. He is the fiction editor of The American and an editor at Statorec.com. 

Quite Close To Murder

Carol—a film adaptation of Patricia Highsmith’s The Price of Salt—Todd Haynes serves up a demure set of heroines, lovers who are as refined as their cashmere sweater sets, coolly principled in the face of a condemning world. Haynes saturates Patricia Highsmith’s 1952 novel in golden hues punctuated with Max Factor reds, and keeps to the dignified tone of her only lesbian novel.

Nothing Embarrassing or Strange: Curating KGB Bar’s Writers’ Series

t’s Harvard Lampoon night at the East Village’s famed KGB bar, and Suzanne Dottino, its Sunday night reading series curator for fourteen years, has arrived early to make sure things run smoothly.

In Conversation

Fostering A More Socially-Conscious Narrative
Olivia Kate Cerrone with David Winner

Olivia Kate Cerrone’s remarkable novella, The Hunger Saint, due to be released in April by Bordighera Press, takes us to a postwar Sicilian world not often written about or discussed: the sulfur mines where young boys called carusi worked in abysmally dangerous conditions, victims of a type of indentured servitude known as a soccorso morto.

In Conversation

Vengeance: ZACHARY LAZAR with David Winner

Every Zachary Lazar book since Sway (2008), his hypnotic study of chance connections between the Rolling Stones, Kenneth Anger and the Manson Family, creates its own genre.

In Conversation

ADAM BRAVER
with David Winner

Adam Braver’s haunting and mysterious novel, The Disappeared, plays with the notion of terrorism and its aftermath. Both of its two protagonists have had loved-ones disappear. Both disappeared-ones may have been lost in terrorist events...

ADVERTISEMENTS
close

The Brooklyn Rail

NOV 2019

All Issues