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Amber Reed

AMBER REED is a graduate of the Brooklyn College Playwriting MFA program. Her essays on Nature Theater of Oklahoma, Sibyl Kempson, and other theater makers have appeared in the Rail and in books published by 53rd State Press and Coffee House Press.

You Will Remember What it Looks Like: Karinne Keithley

Kentucky-Montana is characterized by several impossibilities, the number one impossibility being that the rivers have no banks.

Finding Bess: 17c and the Restoration Theater of Annie-B Parson

Few people owned a clock when Samuel Pepys was born above his father’s tailoring shop in 1633. But they had the day and night, then as ever, and the seasons and phases of the moon.

A Vivifying Spectacle
Target Margin Theater’s Mourning Becomes Electra

Most of us already know something of Eugene O’Neill. His plays are as ineluctable as their characters’ poisoned fates; even if we duck The Emperor Jones in high school, we are caught later by our neighborhood troupe’s Anna Christie, or by the Broadway revival of Long Day’s Journey into Night that our parents believe might finally make us appreciate them.

In Conversation

Jason Grote and Karinne Keithley on the Acousmatic Theater Hour with Amber Reed

Listeners to the Acousmatic Theater Hour, which airs on Sunday nights at 9pm on WFMU, have by now heard Caroline Bergvall reading 47 different English translations of the first sentence of the Inferno; Lumberob revealing, for the first time, the spirit animals of pro golfers; long recordings of work by Richard Foreman, Kathie Kosmider, Will Eno, and other notables; and, as they say, much more.

In Dialogue

Getting Cosmic with Kelly Copper

MELANIA TRUMP Christmas is like ice cream. You have to eat it fast or it melts.

Sibyl Kempson and the Secret Life of Potatoes

When she was nineteen or twenty, Sibyl Kempson began to see cats everywhere she went. They would “just sort of come around corners,” or be sitting in small groups along the path when she walked in the woods.

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The Brooklyn Rail

DEC 19-JAN 20

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