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Adolf Alzuphar

ADOLF ALZUPHAR is a music critic.

Cécile McLorin Salvant: For One to Love

Acclaimed vocalist Cécile McLorin Salvant was raised in Miami as the American-born daughter of a French school principal mother and a Haitian doctor father. Her newest release, For One To Love, is her finest yet. It is an album of twelve songs, five written by Cécile, and seven standards that she is interpreting. The entire band’s performance makes this album phenomenal. The group is made of Aaron Diehl on piano, Paul Sikivie on bass, and Lawrence Leathers on drums.

Lionel Loueke: Gaïa

Gaïa is guitarist Lionel Loueke’s fourth album. Loueke’s albums continue to be remarkable—he is well known for combining African music with deep knowledge of harmony in jazz composition.

Dois Amigos, Um Século De Musica: Multishow Live

In 1969, two young men, in the midst of participating in both political and cultural revolution in Brazil, were sent into exile by their dictatorial government.

Tinariwen: Elwan

With Tinariwen and several other groups, rock has made its way to northeastern Mali/southern Algeria as the beat of Tuareg liberation and yearning, of nomads unhappy about the loss of their beloved homeland Ténéré, which spans parts of the two countries. Their latest album Elwan, which translates to “The Elephants” (on L.A. label Anti-), is proof that Tinariwen and other Tuareg bands are making some of the best rock being produced today.

Danay Suárez, Polvo de la Humedad

Song after song, Cuban artist Danay Suárez’s album Polvo de la Humedad is a well executed hip hop and reggae album. With her grave rapping voice, soulful singing voice, and nuanced rhythms, she mesmerizes with the sincerity of perfected expression.

Various Artists: Desconstrução

The city of São Paulo is a densely populated metropolis and major cultural and financial capital, home to a number of billionaires, major art museums, the largest gay pride parade in the world, an impressive number of universities, a vibrant Afro-Brazilian culture, and Brazil’s most infamous political protests of the 21st century.

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The Brooklyn Rail

NOV 2019

All Issues