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Max Moorhead

is a writer and artist living in Ridgewood, Queens. He has worked in book and magazine publishing including roles at The New Republic, Chelsea Green Publishing, and now at Massie & McQuilkin Literary Agency.

Visions of Resilience: New York City’s Infrastructural Response to Climate Change

When Hurricane Sandy hit New York City in 2012, the storm surge rose over thirteen feet in Battery Park, breaking a record set in 1960, and the New York Stock Exchange was forced to close for two days, the longest closure due to weather since 1888.

Only Connect: A Review of Richard Walker’s Pictures of a Gone City

By 2100 the San Francisco International Airport will likely see half of its runways submerged in water, reports a New York Times article from March. The study referenced in the article argues that land around the Bay Area that previously had been thought to be sinking at two millimeters per year could in fact be sinking by ten millimeters.

Curating Ridgewood

When Kermit Westergaard and his wife Azadeh moved to Ridgewood from Williamsburg, Brooklyn in the summer of 2007 it looked like any other working-class neighborhood in Queens. Westergaard, a native of the Upper East Side, saw an opportunity in Ridgewood for property ownership that was quickly diminishing in Williamsburg, East Williamsburg, and Bushwick.

A Response to Christina Wilkinson

Thank you for taking the time and care to write such a detailed response to my article about Mr. Westergaard. Historical accuracy is of the utmost importance to me, and I value your perspective as a local historian.

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The Brooklyn Rail

OCT 2021

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