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José Peña Loyola

José Peña Loyola is a PhD student in the creative writing concentration at the Hispanic Studies program in the University of Houston. He comes from Ecuador and currently lives in Houston. He holds an MFA in Art Criticism and Writing from the School of Visual Arts. He has worked as a writer and editor for film festivals in Ecuador. His writings about film and visual arts have appeared in small digital publications.

A Guide to Eating and Walking

Manifestos, as I understand them, share the characteristics of maps that I propose here. They reflect the political contexts in which they are produced. And their raison d’être is to declare a movement’s intentions, aims, and proposals. They display their geography explicitly. At the same time, a manifesto can be devised as a tool to present escape routes from the system in which it was produced. Such is the case of “Manifesto Antropófago” by Oswald de Andrade, published in Portuguese in the 1928 inaugural issue of Revista de Antropofagia.

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The Brooklyn Rail

OCT 2021

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