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Jordan A. Rothacker

Jordan A. Rothacker is the author of the novels: The Pit, and No Other Stories (Black Hill Press, 2015); And Wind Will Wash Away (Deeds, 2016); and My Shadow Book by Maawaam (Spaceboy Books, 2017); and the short story collection, Gristle: weird tales (Stalking Horse Press, 2019). December 2021 will see the release of an anthology in tribute to the Comte de Lautréamont, The Celestial Bandit (Kernpunkt Press), edited by Rothacker and featuring twenty-four of today's coolest writers. His essays, reviews, interviews, poetry, and fiction have appeared in such publications as The Exquisite CorpseGuernicaBomb MagazineEntropyVol. 1 BrooklynBrooklyn RailRain TaxiDead FlowersLiterary Hub, and The Believer.He lives in Athens, Georgia, where he received a MA in Religion and a PhD in Comparative Literature from the University of Georgia.

In Conversation

The Disintegrations: ALISTAIR McCARTNEY with Jordan A. Rothacker

Over the last two years I have lost nine friends. I don’t mean lost in some Facebook “unfriend” way (see middle school cafeteria if you’re unfamiliar with the social media outlet), but lost as in passed away. I’m forty now so I guess it might be understandable that my childhood friends are dropping off.

The Feeling and Fear of Inevitability

In the early afternoon of September 11, 2001, approximately 1:30, I boarded a ferry named Carthage in Tunis, Tunisia headed for Marseille, France. The same ferry can be seen in the film Love Actually, in the background when Colin Firth’s character (Jamie) drops Lucia Moniz’s character (Aurélia) off for the last time. As I went through the security check, I hoped my cheerful disposition and appearance as a white, privileged, American backpacker would shield me from a deeper inspection as my bag contained two Berber daggers that I purchased in a bazaar for friends back home. I smiled, my passport was stamped, and I wasn’t given a second look.

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The Brooklyn Rail

OCT 2021

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