Local

Billions for Brooklyn—No Questions Asked

A half-century ago, Robert Moses audaciously promised that his plans for a downtown Civic Center would be "to Brooklyn what the great cathedrals and opera plazas are to European cities." Today, the borough’s leading developers’ promises are just as inflated, with visions of Flatbush Avenue as Brooklyn’s Champs Elysées and the arch at Grand Army Plaza as its Arc de Triomphe.

Fighting for the People’s Firehouse

High noon. McCarren Park, corner of Bedford and Lorimer.

Williamsburg Pentecostals Feel the Spirit

"Pick up the telephone right now! You’ve got a direct line to Jesus," cries the elderly woman to the kneeling group of worshippers sunk into the thick carpet at her feet. On an elevated stage, bathed in a glimmering strobe of lights, the members of Iglesia Carismatica Espiritu de Hermandad shake their hands in the air to the rhythm of the woman’s exhortations to feel the Holy Spirit inside of them.

Hope for Public Housing

There are several different ways to get to Fort Greene’s Whitman/Ingersoll Housing Development. It can be approached through the Metroplex Center, taking one past Einstein Bagels, where office workers stand in the leafy courtyard area smoking; or through Fort Greene Park, a nicely hilled area with a large field and tennis courts. Such tranquility, however, is far from the norm inside the development.

the other boroughs: Manhattan

New York City is the indisputable capital of American classical music. Home to world-renowned facilities such as Lincoln Center and Carnegie Hall, and to top-tier orchestras like the New York Philharmonic, the Metropolitan Opera orchestra and the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, the city is brimming with some of the best classical musicians in the world.

Organic Visions

Surrounded by coiled brambles of razor wire and shattered concrete, Mark Firth and Andrew Tarlow, co-owners of Diner and Bonita, dream of greener pastures. "We are ready for new challenges," says Tarlow, his eyes looking past the teet-ering horizon of South Williamsburg toward the rolling hills of upstate New York, where the two partners plan to start an organic farm this coming spring to furnish fresh produce for their restaurants.r

Some Rules for the Conduct of Young Gentlemen, Part 2

Never wear those visor-hats with advertising messages on them. Especially those that consist of visor only. Very tacky. Don’t tip back on chairs, especially straight chairs or those with rickety legs. They could break apart and embarrass you and cost the owners time and money.

The Starry Skies Above: Astro-Reports

Aries Romantically, the ram’s fleece is waterlogged until January, soggy with fluids perhaps most politely described as unconscious nocturnal drool. Get the hair dryer out in the New Year and fluff up those curls. Just don’t spontaneously combust under the Full Moon Jan 18th.

Dining Car- Organic Visions

Surrounded by coiked brambles or razor wire ad shattered concrete, Mark Firth and Andrew Tarlow, co-owners of Diner and Bonita, dream of greener pastures. “We are ready for new challenges,” says Tarlow, his eyes looking past the teetering horizon of South Williamsburg toward the rolling hills of upstate New York

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WINTER 2003

All Issues